OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Ripple W.J., Estes J.A., Schmitz O.J., Constant V., Kaylor M.J., Lenz A., Motley J.L., Self K.E., Taylor D.S., Wolf andC.  2016.  What is a Trophic Cascade? Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 31(11):824-849.
Ripple W.J., Beschta R.L., Fortin J.K., Robbins C.T..  2015.  Wolves trigger a trophic cascade to berries as alternative food for grizzly bears. Journal of Animal Ecology. 84:652-654.
Ripple W.J., Wolf C., Newsome T.M., Barnard P, Moomaw WR.  2020.  World Scientists’ Warning of a Climate Emergency. BioScience. 70(1):8–12.
Ripple W.J., Beschta R.L..  2004.  Wolves and the Ecology of Fear: Can Predation Risk Structure Ecosystems? BioScience. 54(8):755-766.
Ripple W.J., Wirsing A.J., Wilmers C.C., Letnic M..  2013.  Widespread mesopredator effects after wolf extirpation. Biological Conservation. 160:70-79.
Ripple W.J., Beschta R.L..  2004.  Wolves, elk, willows, and trophic cascades in the upper Gallatin Range of Southwestern Montana, USA.. Forest Ecology and Management. 200:161-181.
Ripple W.J., Beschta R.L..  2003.  Wolf reintroduction, predation risk, and cottonwood recovery in Yellowstone National Park.. Forest Ecology and Management. 184:299-313.
Ripple W.J., Painter L.E., Beschta R.L., Gates C.C..  2010.  Wolves, Elk, Bison, and Secondary Trophic Cascades in Yellowstone National Park. The Open Ecology Journal. 3:31-37.
Ripple W.J., Beschta R.L..  2005.  Willow thickets protect young aspen from elk browsing after wolf reintroduction.. Western North American Naturalist. 65(1):118-122.
Ripple W.J., Wolf C., Newsome T.M., Galetti M., Alamgir M, Crist E, Mahmoud M.I., Laurance W.F..  2017.  World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice. Bioscience.