OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Publications

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Author Title [ Type(Desc)] Year
Filters: Author is L.E. Painter  [Clear All Filters]
Journal Article
Painter L.E., Beschta R.L., Larsen E.J., Ripple W.J..  2014.  After long-term decline, are aspen recovering in northern Yellowstone? Forest Ecology and Management. 329:108-117.
Painter L.E., Beschta R.L., Larsen E.J., Ripple W.J..  2018.  Aspen recruitment in the Yellowstone region linked to reduced herbivory after large carnivore restoration. Ecosphere. 9(8):e02376.
Beschta R.L., Ripple W.J., Kauffman J.B., Painter L.E..  2020.  Bison limit ecosystem recovery in northern Yellowstone. Food Webs. 23(e00142)
Ripple W.J., Newsome T.M., Wolf C., Dirzo R., Everatt K.T., Galetti M., Hayward M.W., Kerley G.I.H., Levi T., Lindsey P.A. et al..  2015.  Collapse of the world's largest herbivores. Science Advances. 1(4)
Painter L.E., Ripple W.J..  2012.  Effects of bison on willow and cottonwood in northern Yellowstone National Park. Forest Ecology and Management. 264:150-158.
Beschta R.L., Painter L.E., Levi T., Ripple W.J..  2016.  Long-term aspen dynamics, trophic cascades, and climate in northern Yellowstone National Park. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 46:548-556.
Painter L.E., Beschta R.L., Larsen E.J., Ripple W.J..  2015.  Recovering aspen follow changing elk dynamics in Yellowstone: evidence of a trophic cascade? Ecology. 96(1):252-263.
Batchelor J.L., Ripple W.J., Wilson T.M., Painter L.E..  2015.  Restoration of Riparian Areas Following the Removal of Cattle in the Northwestern Great Basin. Environmental Management. 55(4):930–942.
Beschta R.L., Painter L.E., Ripple W.J..  2018.  Trophic cascades at multiple spatial scales shape recovery of young aspen in Yellowstone. Forest Ecology and Management. 413:62-69.
Ripple W.J., Beschta R.L., Painter L.E..  2015.  Trophic cascades from wolves to alders in Yellowstone. Forest Ecology and Management. 354:254-260.
Ripple W.J., Painter L.E., Beschta R.L., Gates C.C..  2010.  Wolves, Elk, Bison, and Secondary Trophic Cascades in Yellowstone National Park. The Open Ecology Journal. 3:31-37.