OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Global Trophic Cascades News

How humans, vanishing cougars changed Yosemite

San Francisco Chronicle May 2, 2008: "The loss of top predators, whether it's wolves in Yellowstone or cougars in Yosemite, is having a severe and degrading impact on plant communities," says William Ripple of Oregon State's department of forest resources, the lead author of a report published online in the journal Biological Conservation.

Yosemite: Protected but Not Preserved

Science Magazine May 2, 2008.

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Wolves and Elk Shape Aspen Forests

CurrentResults.com, 2007.

Return of the Wolves

Weekly Reader, December 2007.

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Oregon State is No. 1 in conservation biology

Oregon Live September 6, 2007: Conservation biologists at Oregon State University are tops in their field, earning the No.1 rank among 315 programs in the United States and Canada from the leading professional journal in the field.

Yellowstone’s Wolves Save Its Aspens

The New York Times August 5, 2007.

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Presence Of Wolves Allows Aspen Recovery In Yellowstone

Science Daily (ScienceDaily.com) July 31, 2007. The wolves are back, and for the first time in more than 50 years, young aspen trees are growing again in the northern range of Yellowstone National Park.

Yellowstone trees get help from wolves

MSNBC.com July 27, 2007. "This is really exciting, and it’s great news for Yellowstone," said William Ripple of the Oregon State University College of Forestry. "We’ve seen some recovery of willows and cottonwood, but this is the first time we can document significant aspen growth, a tree species in decline all over the West. We’ve waited a long time to see this, but now we’re optimistic that things may be on the right track."

It All Falls Down

Smithsonian Magazine/Smithsonian.com December, 2006. "The effects have been quite strong and rippled through this ecosystem," says Robert L. Beschta of Oregon State University, who coauthored the study.

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