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Global Trophic Cascades News

Why dozens of Mass. scientists signed the ‘Warning to Humanity’ letter

Boston Globe, Nov. 13, 2017: Of the more than 15,000 scientists who signed a letter Monday warning people about the environmental threats the Earth faces, about 70 of them were professors, researchers, or PhD candidates at Massachusetts universities.

16,000 scientists sign dire warning to humanity over health of planet

CNN, Nov. 15, 2017: More than 16,000 scientists from 184 countries have published a second warning to humanity advising that we need to change our wicked ways to help the planet.

Thousands of scientists issue bleak ‘second notice’ to humanity

This letter, spearheaded by Oregon State University ecologist William Ripple, serves as a “second notice,” the authors say: “Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory.”

15,000 scientists in 184 countries warn about negative global environmental trends

OSU Press Release, Nov. 13, 2017: Human well-being will be severely jeopardized by negative trends in some types of environmental harm, such as a changing climate, deforestation, loss of access to fresh water, species extinctions and human population growth, scientists warn in today’s issue of BioScience, an international journal.

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'Time is running out'

“World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice,” published today in the international journal BioScience, charts the progress — or lack thereof — on the issues highlighted in the original document and renews the call for urgent action. Lead author William J. Ripple, a distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University, said he was astounded by the level of support he and his seven co-authors received for their manuscript.

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In the Game of Extinction, It’s Good to Be Average

William Ripple, an ecologist at Oregon State University, is no newbie in this realm of research. In 2015 he published a paper that found that of the 74 species of large herbivores left on earth, 44 are threatened with extinction.

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The risk of extinction is highest for Earth's largest and smallest animals

"Knowing how animal body size correlates with the likelihood of a species being threatened provides us with a tool to assess extinction risk for the many species we know very little about," says William Ripple, professor of ecology at Oregon State University (OSU) and lead author of the study, in a statement.

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Size matters when it comes to extinction risk

"The largest vertebrates are mostly threatened by direct killing by humans," said a team led by Prof Bill Ripple of Oregon State University in Corvallis, US.

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Global megafauna study calls for conservation rethink

Phys.Org, August 15, 2017: Dr Arian Wallach and Dr Daniel Ramp from the UTS Centre for Compassionate Conversation, along with researchers from Arizona State University and Oregon State University, say the research challenges fundamental ideas surrounding "invasive" species and conservation.

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How one town learned to live with venomous rattlesnakes

Predators like the timber rattlesnake are often the most hated and persecuted wildlife, says William Ripple, a distinguished ecology professor at Oregon State University. This is alarming to scientists, given new research that suggests predators are not only vital to healthy natural environments, but to humanity itself.

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