OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Global Trophic Cascades News

Rangers find 109,217 snares in a single park in Cambodia

Snares – either metal or rope – are indiscriminately killing wildlife across Southeast Asia, from elephants to mouse deer. The problem has become so bad that scientists are referring to protected areas in the region as “empty forests.”

OSU researchers question acceptance of trophy hunting

Researchers at Oregon State University are challenging the premise that trophy hunting is an acceptable and effective tool for wildlife conservation and community development.

Earth’s mammals have shrunk dramatically, and humans are to blame

Something about substantial animals makes them more vulnerable to population collapse, said William Ripple, director of the Global Trophic Cascades Program at Oregon State University. For starters, there are usually fewer of the big animals, at least compared with the little guys.

The hidden life of wolves

Explore how wolves improve ecosystems with this interactive map!

The danger of seeing cute animals everywhere

The Washington Post, April 12: Charismatic animals such as giraffes and pandas are ever-present in ads, logos, films, books and toys. The scientists posit that the ubiquity of these depictions — which they say amount to a “virtual population”— may lead “the general public to think that these animals are common and abundant, when they’re not,” said co-author William Ripple, an ecologist at Oregon State University.

Want to bring back the lions, tigers and bears? Here are the best places on Earth.

OSU Press Release, March 27, 2018: “We wanted to examine the potential for reintroductions globally, not just at a few sites,” said Wolf, who conducted the analysis as a graduate student working with William Ripple, distinguished professor of forest ecology at Oregon State.

‘Rewilding’ Missing Carnivores May Help Restore Some Landscapes

NY Times, March 16, 2017: “We’re just uncovering these effects of large carnivores at the same time their populations are declining and are at risk,” said William Ripple, an ecologist at Oregon State University. He’s found that if you rewild some carnivores, or return them back to lost ranges, a cascade of ecological bounty may follow.

Oregon State University science paper generated global response, financial support

A paper published last December by an Oregon State University scientist became one of the mostly widely shared science papers since 2011, according to the science communications company Altmetric, and has inspired private contributions to support further research. An international team led by William Ripple, distinguished professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State, published “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice” in the journal BioScience.

Global warming drives global warning

Democrat-Herald, Feb. 13, 2018: Bill Ripple, a distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University, has spent a large part of his career studying the interplay between predators, prey and plant life in and around Yellowstone National Park. But that changed in December, when he took the lead role in authoring a paper titled “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice,” which was published in the journal BioScience.

Why dozens of Mass. scientists signed the ‘Warning to Humanity’ letter

Boston Globe, Nov. 13, 2017: Of the more than 15,000 scientists who signed a letter Monday warning people about the environmental threats the Earth faces, about 70 of them were professors, researchers, or PhD candidates at Massachusetts universities.

Pages